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PSA: Clearing up some misconceptions about full nodes

It's time to clear up some misconceptions floating around about full nodes.
Myth: There are only about 5500 full nodes worldwide
This number comes from this site and it measured by trying to probe every nodes on their open ports.
Problem is, not all nodes actually have open ports that can be probed. Either because they are behind firewalls or because their users have configured them to not listen for connections.
Nobody knows how many full nodes there are, since many people don't know how to forward ports behind a firewall, and bandwidth can be costly, its quite likely that the number of nodes with closed ports is at least another several thousand.
Nodes with open ports are able to upload blocks to new full nodes. In all other ways they are the same as nodes with closed ports. But because open-port-nodes can be measured and closed-port-nodes cannot, some members of the bitcoin community have been mistaken into believing that open-port-nodes are that matters.
Myth: This number of nodes matters and/or is too low.
Nodes with open ports are useful to the bitcoin network because they help bootstrap new nodes by uploading historical blocks, they are a measure of bandwidth capacity. Right now there is no shortage of bandwidth capacity, and if there was it could be easily added by renting cloud servers.
The problem is not bandwidth or connections, but trust, security and privacy. Let me explain.
Full nodes are able to check that all of bitcoin's rules are being followed. Rules like following the inflation schedule, no double spending, no spending of coins that don't belong to the holder of the private key and all the other rules required to make bitcoin work (e.g. difficulty)
Full nodes are what make bitcoin trustless. No longer do you have to trust a financial institution like a bank or paypal, you can simply run software on your own computer. To put simply, the only node that matters is the one you use
Myth: There is no incentive to run nodes, the network relies on altruism
It is very much in the individual bitcoin's users rational self interest to run a full node and use it as their wallet.
Using a full node as your wallet is the only way to know for sure that none of bitcoin's rules have been broken. Rules like no coins were spent not belonging to the owner, that no coins were spent twice, that no inflation happens outside of the schedule and that all the rules needed to make the system work are followed (e.g. difficulty.) All other kinds of wallet involve trusting a third party server.
All these checks done by full nodes also increase the security. There are many attacks possible against lightweight wallets that do not affect full node wallets.
This is not just mindless paranoia, there have been real world examples where full node users were unaffected by turmoil in the rest of the bitcoin ecosystem. The 4th July 2015 accidental chain fork effected many kinds of wallets. Here is the wiki page on this event https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/July_2015_chain_forks#Wallet_Advice
Notice how updated node software was completely unaffected by the fork. All other wallets required either extra confirmations or checking that the third-party institution was running the correct version.
Full nodes wallets are also currently the most private way to use Bitcoin, with nobody else learning which bitcoin addresses belong to you. All other lightweight wallets leak information about which addresses are yours because they must query third-party servers. The Electrum servers will know which addresses belong to you and can link them together. Despite bloom filtering, lightweight wallets based on BitcoinJ do not provide much privacy against nodes who connected directly to the wallet or wiretappers.
For many use cases, such privacy may not be required. But an important reason to run a full node and use it as a wallet is to get the full privacy benefits.
Myth: I can just set up a node on a cloud server instance and leave it
To get the benefits of running a full node, you must use it as your wallet, preferably on hardware you control.
Most people who do this do not use a full node as their wallet. Unfortunately because Bitcoin has a similar name to Bittorrent, some people believe that upload capacity is the most important thing for a healthy network. As I've explained above: bandwidth and connections are not a problem today, trust, security and privacy are.
Myth: Running a full node is not recommended, most people should use a lightweight client
This was common advice in 2012, but since then the full node software has vastly improved in terms of user experience.
If you cannot spare the disk space to store the blockchain, you can enable pruning. In Bitcoin Core 0.12, pruning being enabled will leave the wallet enabled. Altogether this should require less than 900MB of hard disk space.
If you cannot spare the bandwidth to upload blocks to other nodes, there are number of options to reduce or eliminate the bandwidth requirement. These include limiting connections, bandwidth targetting and disabling listening. Bitcoin Core 0.12 has the new option -blocksonly, where the node will not download unconfirmed transaction and only download new blocks. This more than halves the bandwidth usage at the expense of not seeing unconfirmed transactions.
Synchronizing the blockchain for a new node has improved since 2012 too. Features like headers-first and libsecp256k1 have greatly improved the initial synchronization time.
It can be further improved by setting -dbcache=3000 which keeps more of the UTXO set in memory. It reduces the amount of time reading from disk and therefore speeds up synchronization. Tests showed that the entire blockchain can now be synchronized in less than 3 and a half hours (Note that you'll need Bitcoin Core 0.12 or later to get all these efficiency improvements) Another example with 2h 25m
How to run a full node as your wallet.
I think every moderate user of bitcoin would benefit by running a full node and using it as their wallet. There are several ways to do this.
So what are you waiting for? The benefits are many, the downsides are not that bad. The more people do this, the more robust and healthy the bitcoin ecosystem is.
Further reading: http://www.truthcoin.info/blog/measuring-decentralization/
submitted by belcher_ to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Getting Started

Hello! Welcome to our awesome /Dogecoin community!
Here you can find very useful information about Dogecoin, Cryptocurrency and more!
Let's start from the beginning.
What is cryptocurrency?
Probably you know Bitcoin, Litecoin, and Dogecoin they are cryptocurrencies. Cryptocurrency is a blockchain-based digital asset that uses cryptography to secure its transactions.
How to start?
Here is a list of things:
Wallet
Why? You need to store your dogecoins somewhere.
Types of wallets:
Paper wallet
*Instruction: *
Step 0. Follow the security checklist recommend
The first! The first step is to download this website from Github and open the index.html file directly from your computer. It's just too easy to sneak some evil code in the 6000+ lines of javascript to leak your private key, and you don't want to see your fund stolen. Code version makes make it much easier to cross-check what actuallrunruns. For extra security, unplug your Internet access while generating your wallet.
Step 1. Generate new address
Choose your currency and click on the "Generate new address" button.
Step 2. Print the Paper Wallet
Click the Paper Wallet tab and print the high-quality quality setting. Never save the page as a PDF file to print it later since a file is more likely to be hacked than a piece of paper.
Step 3. Fold the Paper Wallet
Fold your new Paper wallet following the lines. You can insert one side inside the other to lock the wallet.
Step 4. Share your public address
Use your public address to receive money from other crypto-currency users. You can share your public address as much as you want.
Step 5. Keep your private key secret
The private key is literally the keys to your coins, if someone was to obtain it, they could withdraw the funds currently in the wallet, and any funds that might be deposited in that wallet.
Light Wallet
WoWdoge
Recommended
About:
WowDoge is a lightweight Doge Coin Wallet designed to end the frustrating waiting time downloading gigabytes blockchain! It was created with the intent and success of being exceedingly end-user friendly with a smooth interface. It's uncomplicated and easy to use, allowing fellow shibes to focus on what's important: TO THE MOON! New features will be added upon request! WowDoge is the free and open source! (MIT license)
Download: Windows
OSX
LINUX(.jar)
MultiDoge
About:
MultiDoge is a desktop Dogecoin client, powered by dogecoin. Ported from the MultiBit Bitcoin client. MultiDoge is a thin client Dogecoin wallet. It's a port of the MultiBit client for Bitcoin. The app is based on Dogecoin, which in turn is a port of BitCoinJ. You can find DogecoinJ at google. Langerhans posted all the needed changes for Dogecoin compatibility over. This program uses a special branch of it, which can be found at MultiDoge website.
Core Wallet Official Dogecoin Wallet
Download:
Windows
Linux
OSX
About
Cloud Wallet
Let me don't comment this
Mining
What do you need?
Ideally – cheap electricity and a bunch of graphics cards.
However, you can start mining Dogecoins even using a single PC. You can also mine without using a graphics card, although the progress will be slower. Mining for coins shouldn’t affect the performance of your computer on the default settings since it will only use computing or graphics power when the system is idle.
Mining for coins on a laptop is usually not worth it since it’s not powered on 24/7, the CPU/GPU power is lower, and there is a greater chance of stressing out the chips on the laptop since they’re usually packed into a tighter space, and consequently at more risk of overheating. But if you just want to mine a little bit to get a few coins to play around with, it can do the job.
How to start? Download CUDA miner and fill info inside the window.
MORE SOON! Leave a comment with questions and ideas
You know ;) DU8qXjqCQ4fkNXg2Pxw4KXYMMMXNQxpybE
submitted by mrcyjanek_ to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Why Satoshi's temporary anti-spam measure isn'ttemporary | Raystonn . | Jul 29 2015

Raystonn . on Jul 29 2015:
Eric, any plans to correct your article at https://bitcoinmagazine.com/21377/settling-block-size-debate/?
From: Mike Hearn via bitcoin-dev
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2015 4:15 AM
To: Eric Lombrozo
Cc: Bitcoin Dev
Subject: Re: [bitcoin-dev] Why Satoshi's temporary anti-spam measure isn'ttemporary
Irrelevant what term was used - and as brilliant as Satoshi might have been at some things, he obviously got this one wrong.
I don't think it's obvious. You may disagree, but don't pretend any of this stuff is obvious.
Consider this: the highest Bitcoin tx fees can possibly go is perhaps a little higher than what our competition charges. Too much higher than that, and people will just say, you know what .... I'll make a bank transfer. It's cheaper and not much slower, sometimes no slower at all.
And now consider that in many parts of the world bank transfers are free.
They aren't actually free, of course, but they appear to be free because the infrastructure for doing them is cross subsidised by the fees on other products and services, or hidden in the prices of goods sold.
So that's a market reality Bitcoin has to handle. It's already more expensive than the competition sometimes, but luckily not much more, and anyway Bitcoin has some features those other systems lack (and vice versa). So it can still be competitive.
But your extremely vague notion of a "fee market" neglects to consider that it already exists, and it's not a market of "Bitcoin users buying space in Bitcoin blocks". It's "users paying to move money".
You can argue with this sort of economic logic if you like, but don't claim this stuff is obvious.
Nobody threatened to start mining huge blocks given how relatively inexpensive it was to mine back then?
Not that I recall. It wasn't a response to any actual event, I think, but rather a growing realisation that the code was full of DoS attacks.
Guess what? SPV wallets are still not particularly widespread…and those that are out there are notoriously terrible at detecting network forks and making sure they are on the right one.
The most popular mobile wallet (measured by installs) on Android is SPV. It has between 500,000 and 1 million installs, whilst Coinbase has not yet crossed the 500,000 mark. One of the most popular wallets on iOS is SPV. If we had SPV wallets with better user interfaces on desktops, they'd be more popular there too (perhaps MultiBit HD can recapture some lost ground).
So I would argue that they are in fact very widespread.
Likewise, they are not "notoriously terrible" at detecting chain forks. That's a spurious idea that you and Patrick have been pushing lately, but they detect them and follow reorgs across them according to the SPV algorithm, which is based on most work done. This is exactly what they are designed to do.
Contrast this with other lightweight wallets which either don't examine the block chain or implement the algorithm incorrectly, and I fail to see how this can be described as "notoriously terrible".
I understand that initially it was desirable that transactions be free…but surely even Satoshi understood this couldn’t be perpetually self-sustaining…and that the ability to bid for inclusion in blocks would eventually become a crucial component of the network. Or were fees just added for decoration?
Fees were added as a way to get money to miners in a fair and decentralised way.
Attaching fees directly to all transactions is certainly one way to use that, but it's not the only way. As noted above, our competitors prefer a combination of price-hiding and cross subsidisation. Both of these can be implemented with tx fees, but not necessarily by trying to artificially limit supply, which is economically nonsensical.
We’re already more than six years into this. When were these mechanisms going to be developed and tested? After 10 years? 20? Perhaps after 1024 years?(https://github.com/bitcoin/bips/blob/mastebip-0042.mediawiki)
Maybe when there is a need? I already discussed this topic of need here:
https://medium.com/@octskyward/hashing-7d04a887acc8
Right. Turns out the ledger structure is terrible for constructing the kinds of proofs that are most important to validators - i.e. whether an output exists, what its script and amounts are, whether it’s been spent, etc…
Validators don't require proofs. That's why they are validators.
I think you're trying to say the block chain doesn't provide the kinds of proofs that are most important to lightweight wallets. But I would disagree. Even with UTXO commitments, there can still be double spends out there in the networks memory pools you are unaware of. Merely being presented with a correctly signed transaction doesn't tell you a whole lot ..... if you wait for a block, you get the same level of proof regardless of whether there are UTXO commitments or not. If you don't then you still have to have some trust in your peers that you are seeing an accurate and full view of network traffic.
So whilst there are ways to make the protocol incrementally better, when you work through the use cases for these sorts of data structures and ask "how will this impact the user experience", the primary candidates so far don't seem to make much difference.
Remote attestation from secure hardware would make a big difference though. Then you could get rid of the waiting times entirely because you know the sending wallet won't double spend.
Yes, let’s wait until things are about to break before even beginning to address the issue…because we can “easily create” anything we haven’t invented yet at the last minute.
bitcoinj already has a micropayment channel implementation in it. There's a bit of work required to glue everything together, but it's not a massive project to start using this to pay nodes for their services.
But it's not needed right now: serving these clients is so darn cheap. And there is plenty of room for optimising things still further!
I’m one of the very few developers in this space that has actually tried hard to make your BIP37 work. Amongst the desktop wallets listed on bitcoin.org, there are only two that have always supported SPV (or at least I think MultiBit has always supported it, perhaps I’m wrong). One is MultiBit, the other one is mine. I give you credit for your work…perhaps you could be generous enough to extend me some credit too?
MultiBit has always supported it. I apologise for implying you have not built a wallet. I think yours is mSIGNA, right? Did it used to be called something else? I recognise the website design but must admit, I have not heard of mSIGNA before.
Regardless, as a fellow implementor, I would appreciate it more if you designed and implemented upgrades, rather than just trashing the work done so far as "notoriously terrible", Satoshi as "not a systems architect" and so on.
bitcoin-dev mailing list
bitcoin-dev at lists.linuxfoundation.org
https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/mailman/listinfo/bitcoin-dev
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submitted by bitcoin-devlist-bot to bitcoin_devlist [link] [comments]

Not all is lost, if you had a 'legacy' address on Blockchain.info

I had one of those old addresses on blockchain.info before the 12 word mnemonic phrase and I thought I would be able to view the private key to my old addresses using the Settings interface to open it. I was wrong and upset that I wouldn't be able to get my BCC/BCH (BitCoinCash) because the private key shown through the BCI page doesn't work.
But then I remembered, I was sent a wallet.aes.json file when I first signed up. So although none of the recovery methods in the Coinomi support article worked for me, I managed to find this wallet key tool through a bitcointalk.org discussion. It will open wallet.aes.json files and multibit .key files as well. Mine was encrypted with the password I first used to sign up at blockchain.info. Thank you prof7bit! He deserves some BTC to his address on github if this helps you get some of that free BCH.
edit: grammar and spacing
submitted by silly22 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Best way to migrate clients?

Hello bitcoiners
I am currently using bitcoin core and would like to migrate away from it so i can recover disk space.
I am looking at either electrum or multibit as a replacement.
My question is what is the best way to move my coins? Should I just send them from bitcoin core to an address in the new client and take a hit on the transfer fees?
I do see that electrum allows you to import from other clients but if I read this correctly I lose the convenience of the seed and would rather have the functionality.
submitted by wallywallet to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Is there a Peercoin wallet that doesn't download the entire blockchain? Like Multibit for Bitcoin.

Multibit, for example, scans the blockchain for all references to your addresses, but doesn't download the entire blockchain (which is around 20gb for Bitcoin). Is there a Peercoin wallet that does the same? I'm very low on hard drive space on this computer.
submitted by lecherous_hump to peercoin [link] [comments]

Clearing up some misconceptions about full nodes | Chris Belcher | Feb 10 2016

Chris Belcher on Feb 10 2016:
I've been asked to post this to this mailing list too. It's time to
clear up some misconceptions floating around about full nodes.
=== Myth: There are only about 5500 full nodes worldwide ===
This number comes from this and similar sites: https://bitnodes.21.co/
and it measured by trying to probe every nodes on their open ports.
Problem is, not all nodes actually have open ports that can be probed.
Either because they are behind firewalls or because their users have
configured them to not listen for connections.
Nobody knows how many full nodes there are, since many people don't know
how to forward ports behind a firewall, and bandwidth can be costly, its
quite likely that the number of nodes with closed ports is at least
another several thousand.
Nodes with open ports are able to upload blocks to new full nodes. In
all other ways they are the same as nodes with closed ports. But because
open-port-nodes can be measured and closed-port-nodes cannot, some
members of the bitcoin community have been mistaken into believing that
open-port-nodes are that matters.
=== Myth: This number of nodes matters and/or is too low. ===
Nodes with open ports are useful to the bitcoin network because they
help bootstrap new nodes by uploading historical blocks, they are a
measure of bandwidth capacity. Right now there is no shortage of
bandwidth capacity, and if there was it could be easily added by renting
cloud servers.
The problem is not bandwidth or connections, but trust, security and
privacy. Let me explain.
Full nodes are able to check that all of bitcoin's rules are being
followed. Rules like following the inflation schedule, no double
spending, no spending of coins that don't belong to the holder of the
private key and all the other rules required to make bitcoin work (e.g.
difficulty)
Full nodes are what make bitcoin trustless. No longer do you have to
trust a financial institution like a bank or paypal, you can simply run
software on your own computer. To put simply, the only node that matters
is the one you use.
=== Myth: There is no incentive to run nodes, the network relies on
altruism ===
It is very much in the individual bitcoin's users rational self interest
to run a full node and use it as their wallet.
Using a full node as your wallet is the only way to know for sure that
none of bitcoin's rules have been broken. Rules like no coins were spent
not belonging to the owner, that no coins were spent twice, that no
inflation happens outside of the schedule and that all the rules needed
to make the system work are followed (e.g. difficulty.) All other kinds
of wallet involve trusting a third party server.
All these checks done by full nodes also increase the security. There
are many attacks possible against lightweight wallets that do not affect
full node wallets.
This is not just mindless paranoia, there have been real world examples
where full node users were unaffected by turmoil in the rest of the
bitcoin ecosystem. The 4th July 2015 accidental chain fork effected many
kinds of wallets. Here is the wiki page on this event
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/July_2015_chain_forks#Wallet_Advice
Notice how updated node software was completely unaffected by the fork.
All other wallets required either extra confirmations or checking that
the third-party institution was running the correct version.
Full nodes wallets are also currently the most private way to use
Bitcoin, with nobody else learning which bitcoin addresses belong to
you. All other lightweight wallets leak information about which
addresses are yours because they must query third-party servers. The
Electrum servers will know which addresses belong to you and can link
them together. Despite bloom filtering, lightweight wallets based on
BitcoinJ do not provide much privacy against nodes who connected
directly to the wallet or wiretappers.
For many use cases, such privacy may not be required. But an important
reason to run a full node and use it as a wallet is to get the full
privacy benefits.
=== Myth: I can just set up a node on a cloud server instance and leave
it ===
To get the benefits of running a full node, you must use it as your
wallet, preferably on hardware you control.
Most people who do this do not use a full node as their wallet.
Unfortunately because Bitcoin has a similar name to Bittorrent, some
people believe that upload capacity is the most important thing for a
healthy network. As I've explained above: bandwidth and connections are
not a problem today, trust, security and privacy are.
=== Myth: Running a full node is not recommended, most people should use
a lightweight client ===
This was common advice in 2012, but since then the full node software
has vastly improved in terms of user experience.
If you cannot spare the disk space to store the blockchain, you can
enable pruning as in:
https://bitcoin.org/en/release/v0.11.0#block-file-pruning. In Bitcoin
Core 0.12, pruning being enabled will leave the wallet enabled.
Altogether this should require less than 1.5GB of hard disk space.
If you cannot spare the bandwidth to upload blocks to other nodes, there
are number of options to reduce or eliminate the bandwidth requirement
found in https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node#reduce-traffic . These include
limiting connections, bandwidth targetting and disabling listening.
Bitcoin Core 0.12 has the new option -blocksonly, where the node will
not download unconfirmed transaction and only download new blocks. This
more than halves the bandwidth usage at the expense of not seeing
unconfirmed transactions.
Synchronizing the blockchain for a new node has improved since 2012 too.
Features like headers-first
(https://bitcoin.org/en/release/v0.10.0#faster-synchronization) and
libsecp256k1 have greatly improved the initial synchronization time.
It can be further improved by setting -dbcache=6000 which keeps more of
the UTXO set in memory. It reduces the amount of time reading from disk
and therefore speeds up synchronization. Tests showed that the entire
blockchain can now be synchronized in less than 3 and a half hours
(See
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/6954#issuecomment-154993958)
Note that you'll need Bitcoin Core 0.12 or later to get all these
efficiency improvements.
=== How to run a full node as your wallet ===
I think every moderate user of bitcoin would benefit by running a full
node and using it as their wallet. There are several ways to do this.
(https://bitcoinarmory.com/) or JoinMarket
(https://github.com/AdamISZ/JMBinary/#jmbinary)
Multibit connecting only to your node running at home, Electrum
connecting only to your own Electrum server)
So what are you waiting for? The benefits are many, the downsides are
not that bad. The more people do this, the more robust and healthy the
bitcoin ecosystem is.
original: http://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2016-February/012435.html
submitted by dev_list_bot to bitcoin_devlist [link] [comments]

Sending before Sync is finished?

I tried to be cautious and deliberate about my foray into bitcoin but still running into stumbling blocks. The Qt client has been running for several hours and is barely finished synchronizing. I've already sent money into the wallet address provided by the client but now I'm worried my 120gb HD won't have enough space to hold the ridiculously huge blockchain.
Is there a way to bail out of the Qt client and use something that's a little more responsive (such as multibit) AND keep my money without waiting for the blockchain, or am I tied for the time being?
I'm still not clear what the 'wallet' is exactly when it exists as a file. Is it the address or is it a snapshot of your wallet at a given time? If it's the latter, wouldn't a one-time backup be sufficient? So confused. And what's the compatibility of wallets between programs?
submitted by aceticacidz to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

BITCOIN FREE WALLET HOW TO GET A BITCOIN WALLET - Safe and Secure Way - YouTube How to Mine Bitcoins Using Your Own Computer - YouTube KryptonBit Presentation English - YouTube UNBOXING: Ledger Blue - Bitcoin Hardware Wallet

MultiBit is a popular Bitcoin wallet program that aims to combine fast startup times, a simplified feature set, and support for multiple languages.. Note: MultiBit is no longer supported.This post was written in 2014 and only slightly modified since then. It remains for those who may need to use MultiBit Classic, but should not be used by beginners. Buy Bitcoin Worldwide does not offer legal advice. Using a new address for each transaction helps prevent spying on your payments and funds. KeepKey acquired Multibit a little over 1 year ago. At the time, the engineers who originally built and supported Multibit had announced that they would no longer be working on it or providing support. For ... Summary: How to Use MultiBit Bitcoin Wallet. Download the software from the MiltiBit’s website on your computer and run the installation program.; Register a MultiBit account or add the hardware wallet ().Fill out space at “Create wallet words” page and write down a passphrase on paper (so as not to forget). Q&A for Bitcoin crypto-currency enthusiasts. Stack Exchange network consists of 176 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.. Visit Stack Exchange MultiBit has been in the Bitcoin space since 2011. In that time it has seen continuous development and improvement. Back in March 2014 ... (SHA256(publicKey)) similar to a Bitcoin address; The outcome is then suitable for use as a unique identifier for a particular set of wallet words; The salt value for Scrypt is completely different to that used when storing the MultiBit HD wallet so there ...

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